Levothyronine Sodium Tablets

Product/Composition:- Levothyronine Sodium Tablets
Form:- Tablets
Strength:- 25mcg
Production Capacity 10 Million Tablet/Month
Therapeutic use:- Hormones & Steroids
Package Insert/Leaflet: Available upon request

Description

Thyroid hormone drugs are natural or synthetic preparations containing tetraiodothyronine (T4, levothyroxine) sodium or triiodothyronine (T3, liothyronine) sodium or both. T4 and T3 are produced in the human thyroid gland by the iodination and coupling of the amino acid tyrosine. T4 contains four iodine atoms and is formed by the coupling of two molecules of diiodotyrosine (DIT). T3 contains three atoms of iodine and is formed by the coupling of one molecule of DIT with one molecule of monoiodotyrosine (MIT). Both hormones are stored in the thyroid colloid as thyroglobulin. Thyroid hormone preparations belong to two categories: (1) natural hormonal preparations derived from animal thyroid, and (2) synthetic preparations. Natural preparations include desiccated thyroid and thyroglobulin. Desiccated thyroid is derived from domesticated animals that are used for food by man (either beef or hog thyroid), and thyroglobulin is derived from thyroid glands of the hog. The United States Pharmacopeia (USP) has standardized the total iodine content of natural preparations. Thyroid USP contains not less than (NLT) 0.17 percent and not more than (NMT) 0.23 percent iodine, and thyroglobulin contains not less than (NLT) 0.7 percent of organically bound iodine. Iodine content is only an indirect indicator of true hormonal biologic activity.

Since liothyronine sodium (T3) is not firmly bound to serum protein, it is readily available to body tissues. The onset of activity of liothyronine sodium is rapid, occurring within a few hours. Maximum pharmacologic response occurs within 2 or 3 days, providing early clinical response. The biological half-life is about 2-1/2 days. T3 is almost totally absorbed, 95 percent in 4 hours. The hormones contained in the natural preparations are absorbed in a manner similar to the synthetic hormones. Liothyronine sodium has a rapid cutoff of activity which permits quick dosage adjustment and facilitates control of the effects of overdosage, should they occur. The higher affinity of levothyroxine (T4) for both thyroid-binding globulin and thyroid-binding prealbumin as compared to triiodothyronine (T3) partially explains the higher serum levels and longer half-life of the former hormone. Both protein-bound hormones exist in reverse equilibrium with minute amounts of free hormone, the latter accounting for the metabolic activity.

Liothyronine sodium therapy may potentiate the action of anticoagulants. Phenytoin levels may be increased by liothyronine. Anticonvulsants, such as carbamazepine and phenytoin enhance the metabolism of thyroid hormones and may displace thyroid hormones from plasma proteins. Initiation or discontinuation of anticonvulsant therapy may alter liothyronine dose requirements. If co-administered with cardiac glycosides, adjustment of dosage of cardiac glycoside may be necessary. Colestyramine and colestipol given concurrently reduces gastrointestinal absorption of liothyronine. Liothyronine raises blood sugar levels and this may upset the stability of patients receiving antidiabetic agents. Liothyronine increases receptor sensitivity to catecholamines thus accelerating the response to tricyclic antidepressants. A number of drugs may affect thyroid function tests and this should be borne in mind when monitoring patients on liothyronine therapy.